Kelly McDonald: Keeping It Real
Piss, Pooh and Spew

From Jacinda Ardern’s instagram feed, 6 May 2020

Piss, Pooh and Spew is inspired by New Zealand Prime-minister Jacinda Ardern’s instagram post (above), which she captioned with the question "Why is it only when you are the furthest you could possibly be from a change of clothes before you notice that you have nappy cream on you?"  Before Jacinda’s first media interaction of that day, the smear had been concealed behind a brooch; jewellery to the rescue!

 

Madeleine Albright, American politician, diplomat and first female Secretary of State, also knew the power of the lapel. As she mentions, she made good use of her ample chest proportions, wearing her extensive collection of brooches as ‘covert devices’ for communication. Her ‘pins’ as she called them, became part of her diplomatic signature, allowing her to indirectly communicate with fellow staff, media and international leaders. Albright says in her 2009 book Read my Pins, a strategically placed ‘shimmering sun’ bode well for negotiations, while a crab or ‘menacing wasp’ spoke of less positive dialogue, and astute watchers would track the mood of the day by watching her left jacket lapel.

 

Ardern’s post sparked much international media attention, drawing praise from other working mothers who posted comments such as “You keep it real!”. This sentiment also struck a creative chord with me and will be the focus of my play in the studio this week.

Goldilocks
 

Goldilocks (& Jacinda), Brass pot scourer/scrubber

Stones for a Glass Ceiling
 

Stones for the Tribe, 2020

Stone for a Glass Ceiling, 2020. Greywacke pebble, steel, gold

You never know when you might need a stone for a glass ceiling. With this brooch, you always have one close at hand – yank and throw!

[A ‘glass ceiling’ is an invisible barrier preventing women and minorities from career progression regardless of achievements or qualifications.]

Jacinda wearing brooch

© 2020
Occupation: Artist